NABLEO Blasts Boston Police for Tweet Honoring Celtics’ Auerbach During Black History Month

Tuesday, February 13, 2018
GoLocalProv News Team

The National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers is blasting the Boston Police Department for a tweet honoring legendary Boston Celtics head coach Red Auerbach during Black History Month.

The Boston Police removed the tweet and issued an apology. 

NABLEO released the following statement:

Black History Month is a time during which the nation takes pause to recognize the achievements, contributions, and accomplishments of the many African American citizens who have made this country what it is today. It is a celebration not only of our culture but a recognition of the heritage that belongs to every African American citizen from coast to coast. It is a heritage that has generated leaders like the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., W.E.B. Dubois, Malcolm X, Harriett Tubman, Rosa Parks, and the 44th President of the United States of America, the Honorable Barack H. Obama.

Yet today, the Boston Police Department has chosen to denigrate that heritage by praising the accomplishments of a white male solely because he hired a Black man. While the sports acumen and accomplishments of Red Auerbach are, indeed, legendary, they do not qualify him for the honor of being recognized during Black History Month. Even the deletion of what may only be considered as an ill-conceived tweet cannot pretend to make amends to a community that is constantly battling issues of discriminatory treatment by what some have described as an offending force. And what is more perplexing about this sad affair is that the Boston Police Department is headed by an African American Chief of Police who should have known better.

The Board of Directors and Membership of the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers expresses their amazement and dismay at this offensive announcement, and call upon Superintendent-in-Chief William Gross to personally apologize for this affront, not only to the members of the Boston community who have been rightly and righteously offended, but to the many men and women of color who serve both with and under his command, as this has no less slandered their service as well. The city deserves nothing less and, quite obviously, much more.

  • Tom Yawkey

    The legacy of the former owner of the Boston Red Sox, who passed away in 1976, is currently in the media glare for his views and actions while head of the club. 

    “It’s time to banish the racist legacy of Tom Yawkey,” wrote Adrian Walker for the Boston Globe on Monday, of the former owner of the Sox for 44 years, starting in 1933.  

    Wrote Walker, “All this history raises an uncomfortable, current-day question. Why on earth does Boston have a street called Yawkey Way? Or a Yawkey MBTA station? At a time when activists, especially on college campuses, are clamoring for renaming monuments to racist history, it’s long past time for Boston to think long and hard about the official Yawkey legacy. That the Red Sox are so central to the city’s psyche makes it even more urgent for Boston to act now to banish this legacy of racism.”

    Last year, the Globe’s Robert Burgess posed,"Was Tom Yawkey Boston's Donald Sterling," making a comparison to the now former LA Clippers owner who was banned by the NBA for making racist remarks. 

    “Unfortunately, Boston knows a thing or two about racism in sports," wrote Burgess. "While Sterling’s alleged words are offensive to many, let’s not sit too proud on our high horse.”

     
  • Brown University

    “In 2003, Brown University president Ruth Simmons opened an investigation into the school’s role in the slave trade. The findings exhumed unsettling accounts of the many ways in which important founders of the institution participated in and benefited from slavery, including the use of slave labor to construct the oldest and most iconic building on campus, University Hall,” wrote Northwestern Professor Jennifer Richeson in a piece entitled "What Ivy League Ties to Slavery Teach About Redemption."

    As part of its recognition of its past ties to the slave trade, Brown unveiled its slavery memorial last year, which reads, “Rhode Islanders dominated the North American share of the African slave trade, launching over a thousand slaving voyages in the century before the abolition of the trade in 1808, and scores of illegal voyages thereafter. Brown University was a beneficiary of this trade.”

    A Manhattan Institute Fellow broached the issue of Brown changing its name when it took up renaming Columbus Day to "Fall Weekend", but the idea got little traction. 

    "If you're going to get rid of the day honoring Columbus because he was involved in slavery, I don't see how you can bypass the Brown problem," said John Leo, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. "They have to be consistent with their message on slavery. And if they’re not willing to do that, then there's no reason to take them seriously."

    Now, Brown just announced it is investing $100 million to "promote diversity and inclusion" on the campus, in light of pressures from the students and community to address ongoing racial issues on campus.  

     
  • H.P. Lovecraft

    H.P. Lovecraft, one of Providence’s most famous authors, known for “The Call of Cthulhu” and other works of horror fiction, is also known for a fair degree of controversy about racially-charged aspects of his writing. 

    “It’s OK to admit that H.P. Lovecraft was racist,” wrote Laura Miller for Salon in 2014. Meanwhile, numerous literary analyses and blog posts, including “The ’N’ Word Through the Ages: The ‘Madness’ of HP Lovecraft” and “Lovecraft, Racism, and the ‘Man of his Time’ Defense" give the author much less of pass. 

    Lovecraft and his work where heralded with much fanfare this past summer in Providence for NecronomiCon, “celebrating 125 years of weird in the heart of Lovecraft’s city.”  Meanwhile, much more quietly, the Atlantic Cities reported that starting next year, the World Fantasy Award trophy will no longer be modeled after the massively influential horror-fiction writer H.P. Lovecraft. "Small, corrective steps matter, not for the past, but for the future," wrote Lenika Cruz. 

     
  • John Winthrop

    “John Winthrop, the first governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony, kept American Indians as slaves and helped to write the first law in the US officially sanctioning the practice of keeping African slaves,” wrote C.S. Manegold for the Boston Globe in “New England’s scarlet ‘S’ for slavery” in 2010. 

    In terms of legacy, Winthrop is one of a number of historic figures that is subject to the “latest call by students at Harvard University for the school to purge terms or symbols deemed offensive by a vocal minority raises [in] what could be a confounding issue: How far will the 379-year-old school go to distance itself from historic figures whose actions and social values we would not approve today?” wrote Evan Lips for the NewBostonPost on December 4, as Harvard's Winthrop House” is one of a number at the school named for for a prominent Massachusetts leader who profited from slavery. 

     
  • Ralph Papitto

    In 2007, the then 80-year-old Ralph Papitto — “a big time donor to [Roger Williams University] and a longtime chairman of its board — expressed deep regret for uttering a racist slur about black people at a board meeting,” the Wall Street Journal reported

    “I take full responsibility for this matter and ask for understanding from the community,” Papitto said in the statement. “I do not want this controversy, which at present is running out of control, to further the damage already caused to the university.”

    The law school had opened at the Bristol, Rhode Island institution in 1993 and was named for Papitto in 1996, but just over 10 years later saw his name removed -- at his request -- in light of the scrutiny for the racist remarks.

     
  • Harvard Law School

    “A group of Harvard Law students called Royall Must Fall, is taking issue with the law school’s seal, parts of which come from the Royall family crest. Isaac Royall, Jr. was a slave owner and son of a slavetrader who played a key role in creating Harvard Law School,” wrote WBUR on December 2. 

    Following an outcry from students, officials from the school are "examining the continued use of the seal, in what is the latest controversy over race and historic injustices on US college campuses in recent weeks."

    “Symbols are important,” Martha Minow, dean of the law school, said this week to the Boston Globe. “They become even more important when people care about them and focus on them.”

     

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