Benny’s Gives Update on Store Closings, 40% Off Sale Ends

Saturday, September 30, 2017
GoLocalProv Business Team

Benny's
Benny’s has given an update on the wind-down operations of their 31 locations across New England that are expected to close by the end of the year. 

They have also announced that their 40% off sale has ended. 

Benny's announced they were closing all stores earlier this month and lay-off more than 700 full and part-time workers in the process. 

“We intend to wind down the business in an orderly, structured way, at the same time focusing our efforts on the most responsible way to dispose of the real estate we own with an eye toward future use. It is also important to all of us that our community knows that this is a calculated business decision based on our knowledge of the retail industry and where it is going in the future. That future is not so bright for small, family-owned chains like ours. We’ve lived and breathed this way of doing business for a long time, but we could not, in good conscience, leave the business to the next generation of our family when these market conditions would so clearly conspire to work against them,” said Arnold Bromberg in an earlier interview.

Benny's Store Closing Update

Closed: 

  • Wed 9/27 - East Providence RI (Pawtucket Ave)

 

Announced to close: 

  • Sat 9/30 - Middleboro MA, Cranston RI (Park Ave only, Atwood Ave remains open)
  • Wed 10/4 - Danielson CT. (774 No. Main St.)
  • Fri 10/6 - Old Saybrook CT, Norwichtown CT, Killingly CT, (543 Wauregan Rd.), East Wareham MA, South Dartmouth MA
  • Sat 10/7 - Bristol RI, Middletown RI, Westerly RI, Warwick RI (West Shore Rd only, Warwick Ave remains open)

 

The following stores will remain open until further notice: 

Rhode Island:
• Coventry 
• East Greenwich
• Warwick (1109 Warwick Ave.) 
• Greenville 
• Wakefield     
• Providence (Branch Ave and Service Center at 1100 North Main St.) 
• Cranston (Atwood Ave)

Massachusetts:
• Seekonk (96 Taunton Ave. and 17 Central Ave.)
• Mansfield
• Taunton
• Fall River 
• Fairhaven
• Plymouth 
• Dennisport 
• North Attleboro 

Connecticut: Groton
 

  • Lincoln Chafee

    Former Rhode Island Governor and United States Senator

    "I think these are two separate, unfortunate circumstances. Benny's is a victim of the present evolution of capitalism that favors the biggest chains which can provide lower prices. I hesitate to comment with any authority about the reasons for Alexion leaving Rhode Island.

    But as a rule, companies don't like uncertainty and we face large deficits in our fiscal forecast as well as the fact that RhodeWorks is being put on a credit card - the hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent but the toll scheme of payment has yet to be implemented. And the trucking association has publicly promised a legal challenge."

     
  • Patricia Morgan

    House Minority Leader - Potential GOP Gubernatorial Candidate

    "This is an issue of political will. Alexion could have chosen to consolidate to Rhode Island, but they went to Massachusetts instead.  The 1,000+ jobs being lost by Benny’s and Alexion, in addition to the 500 manufacturing jobs Rhode Island lost last quarter are indicative of a hostile business environment in our state.  We’ve known for decades that our economic foundation is weak and in need of repair.  

    Unfortunately, our state leaders lack the political will to tackle the fundamental reform that will change our business climate for the better. Until we have leaders in Rhode Island who are willing to fight to make our state a place companies would rather be than anywhere else, we will continue to lose jobs."

     
  • Giovanni Feroce

    CEO, BENRUS - Former State Senator and Potential GOP Gubernatorial Candidate

    "The hit is on two levels. Number one, there is the direct hit, loss of jobs being the paramount short term concern.  We need to be proactive in "landing" the talent that worked there quickly in new roles at new companies.

    The second is the real hit, which in military terms we call the "second and third order effects." How does this impact the community as a whole?  We need to be vigilant in incorporating planning.  We don't have planning processes that I know of in economic solutions at the state and local levels. No one is feeding a "Master Plan." In the months to come, I will be very specific as to what that looks like.  The superiority in understanding and executing a plan and dealing with contingency planning will provide confidence to Rhode Islanders that leadership exists, but it requires a "coming together" as a whole to focus on what is best for Rhode Island and not what is best for an individual or one company or one political party.  We must adapt to the 21st-century business environment in a transformational and comprehensive way.  We can do it.

    I have always believed that a proactive approach to asking RI businesses what they need and not a "luring" of individual companies that do not feed a master plan is the best short term approach.  At the end of the day, these "surprise" announcements mean there is a lack of communication.

    [The job losses] are clearly indicative of Rhode Island's lack of a comprehensive approach to business sectors.  A few years ago I took a trip to see the third lock being built in Panama, next thing you know Savannah, GA built a whole infrastructure 20 miles inland out to the port to become the new leader in anticipating and receiving goods, therefore becoming a leader in an industry.  It is that kind of thinking we need here in Rhode Island." 

     
  • Mike Stenhouse

    CEO, Rhode Island Center for Freedom and Prosperity

    "As our Center has warned for years, Rhode Island will continue to suffer hits like this, many of them smaller and un-publicized, until we make serious reforms that improve our state's dismal business climate. The corporate welfare strategy that taxes all of us, along with the anti-employer agenda of the progressive-left, are failing the businesses and people of Rhode Island. 

    While it's unclear if it could have saved Benny's, major reductions to the sales tax remains the most impactful reform that we can undertake. It would make our state more competitive, while increasing our consumer base, and would also be a boon to retailers as a hedge against the growing Internet sales trend."

     
  • Pat Ford

    Chair, Rhode Island Libertarian Party

    "[PawSox] Stadium, UHIP, parking meters, 38 Studios, and on and on. What do you get?  Poof.  1000 jobs disappear."

    (Ford pictured right)

     
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